Wiley Ford Animal Clinic

Veterinarian, Veterinary Medicine, Pet Health, Wiley Ford, Cumberland

Richard Keller, DVM

Dr. Richard "Rick" Keller earned his DVM degree in 1999 as a graduate of The University of Georgia, College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Keller also has B.S. and M.S. degrees in Biology from Frostburg Stage University.

Elmer "Rick" Keller Jr, Dr. Keller's father, has been working in the Veterinary Profession for over 45 years as a Veterinary Technician.

Wiley Ford Animal Clinic was started in September of 2007 in order to bring convenient, friendly, and caring pet health care to local residents. We strive to provide quality health care and support for our patients.

Assisting Staff include:  Carletta Sandman, Wendi Getz, Sarah Houdersheldt, and Bell Long.

We, the staff of Wiley Ford Animal Clinic, work together to provide our patients with the best medical care possible. We also strive to give our clients guidance, support, and the education that they may need in order to ensure the health and happiness of their beloved companions.

Thank you for your trust and support as we care for your pets.

Rick Keller, DVM

AVMA
PET SAFETY INFORMATION TIPS

COLD WEATHER HAZARDS

Take steps to ensure your pets health during cold weather.

BE PREPARED:
• Talk to your veterinarian about your pet’s risks in cold weather
• Have an emergency kit that includes your pet’s needs in case of severe weather or prolonged power outage
• If your dog has a short coat or seems bothered by cold, consider a sweater or dog coat
• Consider booties for your dog’s feet; make sure they fit!
• Ensure outdoor pets have insulated shelter and unfrozen drinking water. In extreme cold, even outdoor pets should stay inside

KNOW YOUR PET’S LIMITS:
• Know your pet’s tolerance for the cold; adjust accordingly
• Shorten walks in very cold weather
• Contact your veterinarian if your pet is shivering or extremely lethargic after being out in the cold

AVOID INJURY/POISONING:
• Check under your car, bang the hood, and honk the horn before starting the engine
• Use pet-safe de-icing products
• Clean up any antifreeze spills quickly
• Stay away from frozen ponds, lakes and streams
• Only take your pet in the car when absolutely necessary. Never leave your pet unattended in a vehicle
• Check your dog’s paws frequently for signs of irritation or injury
• Wipe down or wash your pet’s feet, legs and belly to remove packed snow, ice, salt and de-icing chemicals after walks


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Questions or Concerns?  Ask us; we are always happy to help!
AVMA.org/PetHealth
Brought to you by your Veterinarian and the American Veterinary Medical Association
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WARM WEATHER HAZARDS


Keep your pets safe during hot weather.

Ask your veterinarian how to recognize signs of heat stress, and seek emergency veterinary care
if you observe any of these signs:
• Anxiousness
• Excessive panting
• Restlessness
• Excessive drooling
• Unsteadiness
• Abnormal gum and tongue color
• Collapse


BE PREPARED:
• Talk to your veterinarian about warm weather risks for pets (and travel safety if you plan to travel with a pet)
• Make sure your pets have unlimited access to fresh water, and access to shade when outside
• Keep your pet free of parasites that are more common during warm weather, such as fleas, ticks and heartworm


KEEP PETS AT HOME:
• Provide different temperature zones within your house for your pet’s  comfort
• Never leave a pet in the car, even in the shade or with windows cracked. Cars can overheat quickly to deadly
temperatures, even when the weather isn’t severe


KEEP THEM COMFORTABLE:
• If it’s hot outside for you, it’s even hotter for your pet
• Take walks, hikes or runs during the cooler hours of the day
• Avoid hot surfaces, such as asphalt, that can burn your pet’s paws
• Ask your veterinarian if your pet would benefit from a warm-weather haircut or sunscreen


IF YOU WALK, HIKE OR RUN WITH YOUR PET:
• Consult your veterinarian prior to starting an exercise program for your pet. Overweight pets and short-nosed
dog breeds have higher risk of  problems with warm weather exercise
• Don’t walk, run or hike with a dog during the hottest parts of the day or on particularly warm days
• Take frequent breaks, and take enough water for yourself and your dog